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The new 2018 PDGA putting rule for holing-out (Rule 807B “Completing the Hole”) reads as follows:


“In order to complete a hole with a basket target, the thrower must release the disc and it must enter the target above the top of the tray and below the bottom of the chain support, and come to rest supported by the target.”


This simplification creates some definite changes that you NEED to know.

In this guide, reviewed and approved by the PDGA Rules Committee we’ll provide:

  • Complete overview of the new 2018 rule (video below)
  • An explanation for the rule change
  • Answers to Frequently Asked Questions
  • Our top Putter recommendations for 2018

So let’s get started!

VIDEO GUIDE: Complete Overview of the New Rule

Watch this super-quick video to learn everything you need to know!

 

Rule Change Rationale

The change is a simplification of the original rule, which previously went into detail about what specific components of the target were considered legal for holing-out.

While the new rule does technically allow for some odd scenarios, these are all either functionally impossible or so rare that it doesn’t make sense to complicate the rule to account for the negligibly small number of occurrences.

Here is a quote from the Chairman of the PDGA Rules Committee, Conrad Damon:


“For a disc to have holed out, two conditions must have been satisfied:

  1. The disc entered the target correctly. Technically, that means it broke the cylindrical plane from the top of the tray to the bottom of the chain support.
  2. The disc is supported by the target.

That second condition is a simplification and removes the talk of “inner cylinder”, etc. It allows for a few edge cases (extremely rare in actual play but common on discussion boards), which I feel is a worthwhile compromise.”


In my opinion, simplification is good. A rules manual that attempted to account for every possible circumstance in the sport would need to be 300 pages long.

As Conrad says above, while the new rule does allow for some wedge/hang situations, these are EXTREMELY rare in play (despite their popularity in theoretical discussion or Instagram pictures), making the simplification a net-win.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What if the basket is blind, and we couldn’t see what happened?

A: There are really three scenarios here:

  1. The Disc is found supported by the Basket — COUNT IT
    • The likelihood that the disc finished supported by the basket but somehow never broke the plane for legal entry is close to zero
  2. The Disc is found supported on top of the Basket — DON’T COUNT IT
    • The likelihood that the disc broke the plane for legal entry and then somehow finished on the top is also close to zero.
  3. The Disc is found wedged in the Basket — USE THE DIRECTION OF APPROACH AS A GUIDE (see graphic below)

  • If the disc is found wedged into the basket on the near side of the basket (“NO” In graphic above) from the direction of approach it would have been impossible for the disc to make a legal entry before coming to rest, so DON’T COUNT IT
  • If the disc is found wedged into the basket on the far side of the basket from the direction of approach (“YES” in graphic above), the disc almost certainly made a legal entry before wedging into the basket – COUNT IT

Q: What if we still can’t get a definitive answer?

A: Just like everything else, you will need to make a group decision on the ruling.

Q: What if the disc brushes the chains, but right before it hits the ground an eagle grabs it and drops it on the top of the basket? Why doesn’t the rulebook include detail on interference by birds of prey? 

A: I am not answering that 😉

Top Putters for 2018

  1. target is a device whose purpose is to clearly determine completion of a hole. A basket target is designed to catch discs and generally consists of a tray, chains, and a chain support mounted on a pole. An object target generally has a marked target area.
  2. In order to complete a hole with a basket target, the thrower must release the disc and it must enter the target above the top of the tray and below the bottom of the chain support, and come to rest supported by the target.
  3. In order to complete a hole with an object target, the thrower must release the disc and it must strike the marked target area of the object

Thoughts or Questions?

If you have any thoughts or additional questions about the guide, please let us know using the comments section below, or let us know using our contact page.  We love to hear from you, and your feedback is always appreciated!

Thanks for Reading!

 

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